They are our soul-mates for sure. 

skunkbear:

Scientists have started to study how dogs take emotional cues from human voices. According to the head researcher: "We’d put an experienced dog up in the scanner, and he’d be up there sitting still. Then we’d bring into the room a less experienced dog. And he’d get so jealous! He just wanted to be on the scanner bed like the other dog. It became the place of happiness."

Photos Courtesy of Borbala Ferenczy and Eniko Kubinyi

Diagram adapted from “Voice-Sensitive Regions in the Dog and Human Brain Are Revealed by Comparative fMRI" by Attila Andics et al.

(via npr)


A challenge and a lesson

I think sometimes people are speaking to me right when I need to hear it. For a long time I haven’t felt much of a challenge. What I mean by that is there hasn’t been something professionally that has made me have those butterflies in quite awhile. And today I did; an interview with Cokie Roberts. I was nervous about it and it went well. I often avoid that which scares me, not liking to face things out of my comfort zone. Which may seem funny considering my job. But today I was reminded that I learn so much more, about myself and the world, when I do just that. 


Yes I have been gone for a few weeks. I could say I had technical issues but technically I forgot to re-up my domain name. And so here we are. 

Yes I have been gone for a few weeks. I could say I had technical issues but technically I forgot to re-up my domain name. And so here we are. 


theatlantic:

The Sugar Addiction Taboo

Now that the holidays have come and gone, it’s time to look in the mirror and ask ourselves, “Did I really need to eat the whole box of chocolates?” If you did it in one sitting, you may suffer from Binge Eating Disorder, a newly-sanctioned psychiatric diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-V by the American Psychiatric Association. But even if you ate the box over several sittings, you might still suffer from its more controversial cousin—Food Addiction, not yet included in the DSM-V.
There’s been a lot of heat about food addiction, but little light. None other than Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, has spoken out in favor of the diagnosis. Yet the psychiatric and the scientific communities have been slow to get on the bandwagon. Many scientists eschew the diagnosis while others embrace it. Not surprisingly, the food industry has largely dismissed the notion. No one argues that food isn’t pleasurable, or even that food doesn’t activate the “reward center” of the brain. But can food truly be addictive? In the same way that alcohol, tobacco, and street drugs are?
Read more. [Image: adriennf/flickr]

theatlantic:

The Sugar Addiction Taboo

Now that the holidays have come and gone, it’s time to look in the mirror and ask ourselves, “Did I really need to eat the whole box of chocolates?” If you did it in one sitting, you may suffer from Binge Eating Disorder, a newly-sanctioned psychiatric diagnosis in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual-V by the American Psychiatric Association. But even if you ate the box over several sittings, you might still suffer from its more controversial cousin—Food Addiction, not yet included in the DSM-V.

There’s been a lot of heat about food addiction, but little light. None other than Nora Volkow, director of the National Institute of Drug Abuse, has spoken out in favor of the diagnosis. Yet the psychiatric and the scientific communities have been slow to get on the bandwagon. Many scientists eschew the diagnosis while others embrace it. Not surprisingly, the food industry has largely dismissed the notion. No one argues that food isn’t pleasurable, or even that food doesn’t activate the “reward center” of the brain. But can food truly be addictive? In the same way that alcohol, tobacco, and street drugs are?

Read more. [Image: adriennf/flickr]


newscatgif:

Coming back to work after the holiday

newscatgif:

Coming back to work after the holiday


theatlantic:

The Most Dangerous Things To Do On Your Phones While Driving

If Werner Herzog hasn’t already convinced you not to touch your phone while driving, perhaps this will. Dialing a cellphone is the most dangerous thing you can do in a car, according to a new study from the New England Journal of Medicine, and increases your risk of crashing or nearly crashing eight-fold.
Researchers collected 12-18 months of driving data from 42 newly licensed teenaged drivers from southwestern Virginia, as well as from 109 more experienced motorists from Washington, all driving cars that had been outfitted with cameras, accelerometers, and GPS devices. 
A team of analysts evaluated the records for evidence of a crash, defined as any physical contact with another object, or a near-crash, defined as a last-minute maneuver that challenged the physical limitations of the vehicle to avoid a collision. These “near-crashes,” the study authors write, are reliable surrogates for crashes. They then correlated the car movements with the camera footage of the drivers, evaluating them for actions like talking on a phone, dialing a phone, looking out the window, or adjusting their radio.
Read more. [Image: Lord Jim/flickr]

theatlantic:

The Most Dangerous Things To Do On Your Phones While Driving

If Werner Herzog hasn’t already convinced you not to touch your phone while driving, perhaps this will. Dialing a cellphone is the most dangerous thing you can do in a car, according to a new study from the New England Journal of Medicine, and increases your risk of crashing or nearly crashing eight-fold.

Researchers collected 12-18 months of driving data from 42 newly licensed teenaged drivers from southwestern Virginia, as well as from 109 more experienced motorists from Washington, all driving cars that had been outfitted with cameras, accelerometers, and GPS devices. 

A team of analysts evaluated the records for evidence of a crash, defined as any physical contact with another object, or a near-crash, defined as a last-minute maneuver that challenged the physical limitations of the vehicle to avoid a collision. These “near-crashes,” the study authors write, are reliable surrogates for crashes. They then correlated the car movements with the camera footage of the drivers, evaluating them for actions like talking on a phone, dialing a phone, looking out the window, or adjusting their radio.

Read more. [Image: Lord Jim/flickr]


Goodbye CCT building
So let me be clear, I hate this building. I mean I seriously loathe it. There is nothing good about it. It has poor lightening, it is virtually windowless and I am pretty sure the carpets have not been deep cleaned since Dean Lesher walked the halls. 
I am no fan of the 1970s architecture that gave way to this grey monstrosity that has at times looked more like a prison than an office. A black iron fence surrounds the entire facility which has always reminded me of the beginning of the movie “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” when the title character is looking at the Wonka Factory. And a man comes by and says “Nobody ever goes in and nobody ever goes out!” Creepy.
I have never been enamored with the clanking door one has to use to exit and enter the newsroom just to get to the rest of the building. The microwaves in the hall have always been especially gross. One is never quite sure if having hot food is worth taking a chance with those bacteria invested boxes. And I have seen my share of spiders, cockroaches and even a snake both inside and outside of this fortress. 
The desks built before the advent of desktop computers and cubicles are an embarrassment. 
From the very first time I walked in to this newsroom more than seven years ago, I have always thought someone should demolish this place. And now someone apparently will. We are moving to an office with so many windows there is no place to hang art. In my opinion that is a fantastic problem to have. 
So why as the last day ever at 2640 Shadelands draws near am I sad? 
Do I have secret love for this dungeon? Have I been complaining all these years but really a dirty old newsroom is exactly what I wanted? I can’t quite put my finger on it. 
The presses here stopped about a year ago. We haven’t smelled that familiar paper and ink stench for quite some time. In fact, I recently walked by the windows that overlook the press room and there was no press! It had at some point been removed. The ghosts of killer, game-changing front pages seem to linger in the dark vast empty space.
And this old building is a depressing shell, with most offices empty, entire wings closed off. The majority of the newsroom staff moved out earlier this year, dispersed to various other offices like pieces of furniture after a patriarch of a family dies. 
So perhaps that’s what this sickening feeling in my stomach is all about. This is a death. When Dean Lesher built this place it was modern and newspapers were essential. And now this place is decrepit and newspapers are failing. But the plight of newspapers is not news, it has been in major decline for the last 10 years, my entire professional career. Declining readership, plummeting ad revenue, layoffs, furloughs, pay cuts and buyouts are a newspaper world I am intimately familiar with. 
But even when something has been sick for a long time, it is still heartbreaking when the pulse finally stops. And for me this building closing is just a giant sign of all that has changed in newspapers and all that was and will never be. 
It was in this newsroom that I watched and took part in breaking stories. This is where I learned that the country would have its first African-American president and it was here in this room at this desk where I wrote hundreds of stories. Not to mention my many personal milestones. This was the office I came back to after I got married. I worked here during my pregnancy and came back after the birth of my son. 
I know the stories, those memories don’t die with this place. But the idea that the Contra Costa Times will no longer reside on Shadelands Drive makes me go cold. It’s not the end of an era it’s a reminder that it ended as we all continue to try and figure out how to navigate a new one.      

Goodbye CCT building

So let me be clear, I hate this building. I mean I seriously loathe it. There is nothing good about it. It has poor lightening, it is virtually windowless and I am pretty sure the carpets have not been deep cleaned since Dean Lesher walked the halls. 

I am no fan of the 1970s architecture that gave way to this grey monstrosity that has at times looked more like a prison than an office. A black iron fence surrounds the entire facility which has always reminded me of the beginning of the movie “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” when the title character is looking at the Wonka Factory. And a man comes by and says “Nobody ever goes in and nobody ever goes out!” Creepy.

I have never been enamored with the clanking door one has to use to exit and enter the newsroom just to get to the rest of the building. The microwaves in the hall have always been especially gross. One is never quite sure if having hot food is worth taking a chance with those bacteria invested boxes. And I have seen my share of spiders, cockroaches and even a snake both inside and outside of this fortress. 

The desks built before the advent of desktop computers and cubicles are an embarrassment. 

From the very first time I walked in to this newsroom more than seven years ago, I have always thought someone should demolish this place. And now someone apparently will. We are moving to an office with so many windows there is no place to hang art. In my opinion that is a fantastic problem to have. 

So why as the last day ever at 2640 Shadelands draws near am I sad? 

Do I have secret love for this dungeon? Have I been complaining all these years but really a dirty old newsroom is exactly what I wanted? I can’t quite put my finger on it. 

The presses here stopped about a year ago. We haven’t smelled that familiar paper and ink stench for quite some time. In fact, I recently walked by the windows that overlook the press room and there was no press! It had at some point been removed. The ghosts of killer, game-changing front pages seem to linger in the dark vast empty space.

And this old building is a depressing shell, with most offices empty, entire wings closed off. The majority of the newsroom staff moved out earlier this year, dispersed to various other offices like pieces of furniture after a patriarch of a family dies. 

So perhaps that’s what this sickening feeling in my stomach is all about. This is a death. When Dean Lesher built this place it was modern and newspapers were essential. And now this place is decrepit and newspapers are failing. But the plight of newspapers is not news, it has been in major decline for the last 10 years, my entire professional career. Declining readership, plummeting ad revenue, layoffs, furloughs, pay cuts and buyouts are a newspaper world I am intimately familiar with. 

But even when something has been sick for a long time, it is still heartbreaking when the pulse finally stops. And for me this building closing is just a giant sign of all that has changed in newspapers and all that was and will never be. 

It was in this newsroom that I watched and took part in breaking stories. This is where I learned that the country would have its first African-American president and it was here in this room at this desk where I wrote hundreds of stories. Not to mention my many personal milestones. This was the office I came back to after I got married. I worked here during my pregnancy and came back after the birth of my son. 

I know the stories, those memories don’t die with this place. But the idea that the Contra Costa Times will no longer reside on Shadelands Drive makes me go cold. It’s not the end of an era it’s a reminder that it ended as we all continue to try and figure out how to navigate a new one.      


Spent my morning, my very early morning, waking my baby and heading out to cover the #bartstrike. Let’s hope this ends soon. 

davidelevine:

Spent my morning, my very early morning, waking my baby and heading out to cover the #bartstrike. Let’s hope this ends soon. 

davidelevine:


Love this. Reminds us not to try for perfection especially when I have the absolute best things in my life already. Happy Friday!

perativa:

. more quotes: http://tinyurl.com/q9dkawa

Love this. Reminds us not to try for perfection especially when I have the absolute best things in my life already. Happy Friday!

perativa:

. more quotes: http://tinyurl.com/q9dkawa


True story! Happy Fall! YAY!

True story! Happy Fall! YAY!